The River Tamar Project seeks to consider the history of the river as a source of inspiration and consider a new dialogue between art, history and social reflection.

Tamar, Imperfect Cinema, 2014
Tamar explores the river, from its picturesque source near Bude to where it meets the sea at the post-industrial city of Plymouth, via a meditative time-travelling document combining original and archive footage and accompanied by a stirring live soundtrack.
Uriel Orlow, The MusselsPerspective-04
Uriel Orlow's film raises thought-provoking questions about how the current landscapes, geography and natural life of the Tamar Valley has been shaped by the mining industry of previous centuries.
Mikhail Karikis Surge Harmonies
Drawing on his recent experiences of working with young people in Italy for Children of the Unquiet (2013-2014), Mikhail Karikis collaborates with the children of Calstock Community Primary School to bring their vision of the River Tamar’s future to life.
The Hall, Melanie Manchot, 2014
The communities and people who live on the banks of the river are essential to its life and give it meaning. Centred on those individuals and groups who occupy these spaces for a few hours each week, The Hall reveals a complex and intimate portrait of modern life on the banks of the Tamar.
Still from Reach, Kayla Parker and Stuart Moore, 2014
Reach is a site-specific film that has been made using the materials and the natural rhythm and flow of the River Tamar itself.
Tamarama, Richard Allman, 2014
Tamarama is an animated journey through the Tamar Valley from the river, capturing the natural beauty of the upper tidal reaches to the modern industrial landscape of the Tamar bridges and naval dockyards.
The Dividing Line, Mark Vernon, 2014
Layered with archival footage from South West Film and Television Archive, Mark Vernon’s film explores the dividing space of Barne Barton, resulting in this community experiencing an unfortunate lack of access to the river, and beautifully explains how important the river is to these people.
Tropikos, John Akomfrah, 2014
Situated in Plymouth and the Tamar Valley – locations with significant, though largely forgotten connections with the expansion of European power and influence – Tropikos is an experimental drama set in the 16th century.
First photo
During the It’s All About the River film festival the River Tamar Project produced a parallel programme of education projects aimed at encouraging young people to learn about creative film making and heritage of the River Tamar.